Answered By: Rebecca Mackle
Last Updated: Feb 03, 2016     Views: 26

Under the revised law (June 2014), all types of copyright work can be copied for the sole purpose of 'illustration for instruction',  which means that lecturers will be able to copy extracts from any copyright work, including a journal, to illustrate a teaching point and to 'fair dealing' amounts.  

In addition, copying is no longer restricted to being done by hand, thus enabling staff and students to copy using digital technology.  Screenshots of journal pages could therefore be copied provided that the person is giving or receiving instruction, or preparing for giving or receiving instruction. 

A university is allowed to make a copy available to a wider audience, provided the purpose is limited to illustration for instruction, so it could be argued that this includes material provided by the university for a course delivered in a school or college.  

'Fair dealing' restrictions apply to work used in this way - so no more of the work can be copied than is necessary for the purpose, and the university must consider if the use impacts upon the commercial market for the original work.